Tag Archives: Park West Galleries art

Park West Gallery Tours Dominic Pangborn’s Studio

The Park West Gallery bloggers recently visited artist Dominic Pangborn at his studio in Detroit, Michigan…..and we have brought back photos to share with everyone!

What was most evident during the studio visit was Pangborn’s unwavering passion for art and for life in general; he never stops creatively exploring new mediums, new techniques, and new ideals. He generates over 2,500 to 3,000 drawings per year, which serve as inspirations for his paintings. His paintings are diverse, ranging from non-representational abstracts to photo realism. His favorite style to work in is his own: personal figurative expressionism in multi-media.

Dominic’s images capture his imagination and unending creativity no matter what medium he chooses to work in. For him, it’s all about expressing his inner soul. When Dominic looks at his drawings from the past, he looks at them with the same curiosity as other onlookers; he often wonders what he was thinking of while he was creating them.

Visit Flickr for a photo tour of Dominic Pangborn’s Detroit studio!

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Happy Birthday Victor Vasarely!

“The art of tomorrow will be a collective treasure or it will not be ART at all.” – Victor Vasarely (April 9, 1906 – March 15, 1997)

Today is an important day in art history; on this day in 1906 the father of Op Art was born in Pecs, Hungary. Victor Vasarely is internationally recognized as one of the most important artists of the 20th century. He is the acknowledged leader of the Op Art movement, and his innovations in color and optical illusion have had a strong influence on many modern artists.

A superb graphic artist, Vasarely studiously developed his techniques before he even began painting. His prints have revealed the quality of his artistry since his first published print in 1949. He has been widely exhibited throughout the world and has had more than one hundred one-person shows. There have been over one hundred commissioned monumental architectural works created by Vasarely.

During the 1950s, Vasarely wrote a series of manifestos on the use of optical phenomena for artistic purposes. According to the artist, “In the last analysis, the picture-object in pure composition appears to me as the last link in the family paintings, still possessing by its shining beauty, an end in itself. But it is already more than a painting, the forms and colors which compose it are still situated on the plane, but the plastic event which they trigger fuses in front of and in the plane. It is thereby an end, but also a beginning, a kind of launching pad for future achievements.”

To view more Vasarely graphic works, visit the Park West Gallery website, which is currently showcasing a portion of the Park West Gallery Vasarely Collection.

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A New Approach to Joan Miró

Joan Miro, Park West GalleryFigures on Red Background (1939) by Joan Miró. Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona. On loan from Emili Fernández Miró. © Successió Miró.

BARCELONA — If you’re planning a trip to Spain in the near future, be sure to add The Joan Miró Foundation to your sightseeing list. Donated by the artist’s family, the Foundation recently acquired seventeen new original Joan Miró works on paper which have all been added to its permanent displays. Over the years, paper was the material that Joan Miró used most often, working with all kinds, from sandpaper and cardboard to newspaper and other printed materials. His artistic output in this medium was innovative and daring (see for yourself by visiting the Park West Gallery Joan Miró Collection online).

Since 1975, the Miró Foundation has been a public center for contemporary art and today it holds the largest collection of the artist’s work. In addition to acquiring new works on paper, the museum’s permanent collection has also been remodeled, courtesy of generous funding by the Catalan Government. New displays, a state-of-the art lighting system and screening room are among the upgrades – all are designed to enhance the visitor’s experience by putting Miró’s work into historical context and providing a more in-depth insight into the artist’s career.

In conjunction with the new installation, entry to the Fundació Joan Miró will be free every Thursday, starting February 18 through March 25, from 5 - 9pm.

For more information on this exhibit, please visit www.fundaciomiro-bcn.org

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The Evolution of Printmaking from Masters to Modern Artists

If you were to survey the Park West Gallery Collection, among other media, you’d find many works of art categorized as various types prints – lithographs, serigraphs, etchings, engravings and giclees - for example. The printmaking medium is often misunderstood or unfortunately dismissed as an inferior method of producing artwork. The truth is, printmaking fosters a unique method of artistic expression and provides great advantages to an artist in terms of being able to easily produce and distribute their original works to the masses. 

During the Renaissance, printmakers created woodcuts, engravings and etchings after notable paintings (Read about The Art of Etching at the Park West Gallery | Rembrandt website). Artists began altering compositions and creating prints after their own works and throughout modern art history, masters including Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, embraced and advanced printmaking techniques. Contemporary artists of today are continuing to develop the field using advanced technology and processes.

Art historian, author, and art critic Joseph Jacobs writes of contemporary artist Itzchak Tarkay‘s use of printmaking:

“Because they are multiples as opposed to unique works of art, prints, quite mistakenly, are often considered a secondary medium. But in Tarkay’s hands it is clear they are not. One look at a work such as In the Lounge, and it can be immediately seen that the artist has a powerful affinity for the physicality of the printer’s ink that virtually transforms this silkscreen into a painting. We can see and feel the three-dimensionality of the ink; it is rich and unctuous, like oil paint. We would hardly know that the pigment was squeezed onto the paper through a fine screen as opposed to being applied with a brush.

Tarkay’s prints are testimony to the extraordinary technical richness of printmaking and the degree to which it can be transformed into a medium of great personal expression. The artist has turned printer’s ink into oil paint, varnish, glazes, watercolor, wash, gouache, graphite, pen and ink, brush and ink, crayon and charcoal. The artist’s touch is so prominent, it is hard to believe that for any print there could be another example that is even similar in appearance.”

(Read the full essay at the Park West Gallery | Tarkay website)

In the Footsteps of Masters: The Evolution of the Reproductive Print, a new exhibit at the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Iowa, examines the role of printmaking in the development of visual culture. Open through May 23, the exhibition covers a span of 500 years, featuring approximately 80 European and American prints from the 15th to the 20th century.

On view are original prints by artists Albrecht Dürer, Jusepe De Ribera, Edouard Manet, Jean-Baptiste Corot, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, William Blake, Francisco Goya and Grant Wood, and others made after the works of famous masters such as Raphael, Peter Paul Rubens, Annibale Caracci, Rembrandt, Jan Vermeer, Jan Van Eyck, Titian, Michelangelo and others.

For more information on this exhibit, please visit www.art-dma.org

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Artist Birthdays October 9 – FRANK DUVENECK

FRANK DUVENECK (October 9, 1848 – January 3, 1919)

  • Nationality: American
  • Field: Painting
  • Art Movement: Realism
  • ARTiFact: The schools he started in Munich (1878) and Florence (1879) were extremely popular - his students became known in artistic circles as “The Duveneck Boys.”
  • Artist Quote: “I don’t care for pupils who claim an abundance of talent; but what I do want is a crowd of good workers.”
  • Notable Artwork (shown below):  The Whistling Boy, 1872.

Frank Duveneck. The Whistling Boy. 1872.

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Norman Rockwell – Dead But Busier Than Ever

Park West Gallery, through association with the Norman Rockwell Licensing Company (the estate of the artist) and Curtis Publishing (owner of the copyrights of the Saturday Evening Post artwork), has been able in recent years to bring new and exceptional collecting opportunities for Norman Rockwell artworks to enthusiastic collectors.
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In the November 2009 issue of Vanity Fair, contributing editor David Kamp takes “a fresh look” at the art  of Norman Rockwell in his article, Norman Rockwell’s American Dream (see below). The article explores the inspiration and creative processes behind Norman Rockwell’s painted vignettes of everyday American life and argues that perhaps the artist is just as relevant today as ever. The following video provides  a wonderful slide show of Norman Rockwell’s artworks accompanied by further discussion of the artist (featuring David Kamp with co-Vanity Fair contributing artist and Rockwell-enthusiast, Ross MacDonald).

Norman Rockwell’s American Dream
By DAVID KAMP • Vanity Fair | November 2009

Judging by the popularity of two traveling retrospectives, and plans for a third exhibition in 2010, America is re-discovering one of its most underappreciated and misunderstood artists: Norman Rockwell. With photographs excerpted from a new book by Ron Schick, the author explores the divide between Rockwell’s rocky private life and his sunny small-town iconography, the elaborate studies behind his paintings, and the truth that lies in his idealized vision of his country—resonating more deeply than ever today. . .

Read the Full Article >>

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Artist Birthdays October 8 – MAX SLEVOGT

MAX SLEVOGT (October 8, 1868 – September 20, 1932)

  • Nationality: German
  • Field: Painting, illustration, printmaking
  • Art Movement: Impressionism
  • ARTiFact: His painting Danae (1859) explored his intrigue with the contemporary issue of prostitution - due to its offensive nature, it caused a scandal during the Munich Secession exhibition of 1899.
  • Artist Quote: “Even the poorest have the right to something from the table of life.”
  • Notable Artwork (shown below):  Strasse bei Godramstein, 1909.

max-slevogt

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Miami Artist Britto Designs Parking Meters to Help Homeless

POP ARTIST Romero Britto has lent his talent, energy and time to many philanthropic causes. Known for his bright colors, pop images and playful themes, Britto’s artwork reflects his unrestrained and optimistic point of view. Park West Gallery Artist Biographies: Romero Britto >>
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Romero Britto, Homeless Trust, MiamiMIAMI, FLORIDA  – The Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust and a renowned South Florida artist have joined forces to introduce an innovative way for residents to help in the fight against homelessness.

Romero Britto has designed parking meters, which will be installed in several areas throughout downtown to collect cash for the cause.

There are plans to make large money collectors that will be placed in malls and the American Airlines Arena as well as Landshark Stadium.

[Source: WSVN.com]
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