We’ve Moved! Visit the New Park West Gallery Blog

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We’ve moved! We’ll no longer be updating this site, but Park West Gallery has just launched a NEW website, where you’ll find our blog. There, we’ll be sharing even more news + information about your favorite artists, gallery events and art world happenings.

Please visit http://www.parkwestgallery.com/blog. See you there!

Park West Gallery shows the power of paint improves lives

Park West Gallery Turnaround Arts New York Times

Students work on self portraits at San Bernardino’s Barton Elementary in California during a Turnaround Arts event. (Photo courtesy of T Studio)

Park West Gallery is taking strides to ensure that art is for everyone, not only through its cruise art auctions, but to ensure art is in the classroom and available for all to enjoy.

In a post created by T Brand Studio on the New York Times site, the importance of including art in education is highlighted by efforts from Park West Gallery and some of the artists it represents, including Autumn de Forest, Romero Britto and Guy Harvey.

Autumn, a 14-year-old artistic prodigy, travels around the country with the Turnaround Arts program, working directly with students to inspire them and promote art education. Turnaround Arts is a public-private program organized by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities to improve low-ranking schools in 14 states. Park West Gallery donates art supplies for the students to use.

“I am honored to work with the Turnaround Arts program,” says Autumn. “This program helps schools that really need the arts, music, dance and theatre.”

According to the article, a two-year study of Turnaround Arts schools demonstrated that math scores had increased by 22.5 percent and reading scores by 12.6 percent. Meanwhile, studies from the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds have revealed that exposure to the arts increases academic engagement and enrollment.

Other artists with Park West Gallery, including Britto and Harvey, encourage arts education, and speak to how it positively impacted their careers as artists.

“I still think that, in school, they should emphasize more arts and culture,” Britto says in the article. “It does give a possibility [to] create something unique and new.”

Along with the artists, Park West Gallery Founder and CEO Albert Scaglione says his 40-plus year career has focused on bringing art to the masses through art auctions and educational efforts. The gallery’s non-profit organization, the Park West Foundation, also plays a key role, such as underwriting museum exhibitions around the country. These exhibitions have included Autumn at the Butler Institute of American Art and Yaacov Agam at the Museum of Geometric and MADI Art.

Read the full article here.

Experience “Art and Serenity” with David Najar

David Najar

Lavender Day” (2014), David Najar

Enter a world of tranquility, full of colorful fields, reflective rivers and swaying trees as Park West Gallery presents the artwork of international artist David Najar in his first solo exhibition at the gallery.

Experience “Art and Serenity” from April 3-29 at Park West Gallery, located in Southfield, Michigan, where 45 new and archival works by Najar will be on display and available to collect for the first time.

Take advantage of the rare opportunity to meet Najar in person during an opening reception held April 2 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

Najar, a native of Israel, can be described as a contemporary expressionist. Visitors can view and collect these engrossing works, including originals and giclées, during the course of the exhibition. David Gorman, Park West Gallery Director, says viewing artwork by Najar allows observers to escape the chaos of their everyday lives and enter a state of serenity in his landscapes.

“These windows into alternate realities promote a sense of calmness and tranquility, elevating the viewer into a dreamlike state,” Gorman says.

Najar says he finds inspiration in nature, emphasizing the beauty of the natural world through oil and acrylic paintings created in a spontaneous and instinctual method.

“Sometimes, to breathe, we think we need such an expensive vacation to somewhere, but we can do it every day,” Najar says. “There is a lot of beauty around us.”

david najar park west gallery

“Season Illusion” (2014), Park West Gallery

Najar has studied with artists such as Moshe Rosenthalis and Park West Gallery artist Itzchak Tarkay. His works have been collected worldwide and exhibited in Israel, the United States and Canada.

“There is a simplicity that exists in Najar’s compositions – the type that can only arrive after decades of perfecting his craft,” Gorman says. “Park West Gallery is pleased to offer a solo exhibition for this internationally acclaimed painter.”

Admission to the exhibition and gallery is complimentary. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. For more information or to RSVP for the opening, call 248-354-2343 or email RSVP@parkwestgallery.com.

Top 10 Park West Gallery moments of 2015

Park West Gallery MI

Park West Gallery had a busy year in 2015, and as we move into 2016, we’re taking a look at some of our favorite moments from the past year.

1. Thomas Kinkade art on canvas

Thomas Kinkade holiday

“Holiday Gathering” (1998), Thomas Kinkade

Park West Gallery is an international art dealer found aboard more than 100 cruise ships. Thanks to this status, it has gained access to Thomas Kinkade artwork that is normally difficult to acquire, and is offering these limited-edition “International Proofs” to its clients.

The six original paintings used as studies for the limited-edition graphic works were created by Kinkade and certified by the artist before his passing. They are among the top 25 best-selling Kinkade paintings, and three are in the top 10.

“We appreciate that Park West shares our vision of maintaining the collectability of Thomas Kinkade artwork and honoring the Kinkade legacy,” states James Lambert, vice president of marketing for the Thomas Kinkade Company.

2.Fox 5 Good Day NY

The art world saw record-setting purchases in 2015 with a Pablo Picasso selling for $179.4 million and a Modigliani for $170.4 million, contributing to more than $2 billion in art sales. To provide insight into the art world and art auctions, Park West Gallery Auctioneer Rob Ducat was invited onto Fox 5 Good Day NY to speak with hosts Rosanna Scotto and Greg Kelly and hold a mock auction.

3. Expanding into China

Park West Art Auction

Park West Art Auction

With cruise lines experiencing a double-digit annual increase of Asian passengers, the industry is sending its biggest and newest ships to define itself in this massive new Asian market. From 2012 to 2014, the number of Chinese passengers grew 79 percent each year.

Park West Gallery is pleased to be on ships with lines like Royal Caribbean International, and expects to have an influence on the global art market. In five years, the gallery has seen a 114 percent increase in the number of clients who live in Asia.

“There is a growing demand for high-quality art, and the Chinese market is showing signs of long-term growth, so I imagine this will continue into the future,” says Park West Gallery Founder and CEO Albert Scaglione.

4. Albert Scaglione in the news

Albert Scaglione Park West Gallery

Park West Gallery Founder and CEO Albert Scaglione had a busy year, with many prominent media outlets profiling him or gaining his insight into the art world. He was featured twice in the Huffington Post and had radio interviews with BOLD, Sunday Edition, Michigan’s BIG Show and StartUpNation. He also made a cameo in a video about the gallery by the Sun Sentinel!

5. Park West introduces dye sublimation art

Michael Cheval dye sublimation absurd art

“Melody of Rain” (2015), Michael Cheval

In continuing its mission to bring the best and most innovative artwork to collectors, Park West Gallery began offering artwork created through dye sublimation. This digital printing process gives artists the chance to create images on aluminum that are far more resistant and durable than traditional canvas or paper.

Artists like Michael Cheval and Guy Harvey are creating artwork with dye-sublimation, are impressed with the results.

“It’s the color, the vividness, the sharpness, it was unbelievable,” Cheval says. “Aluminum makes it like an HDTV.”

6. Autumn de Forest receives award from Vatican

On Nov. 7, 2015, Autumn de Forest received one of the biggest honors to date in the form of the International Giuseppe Sciacca Award for Painting and Art. This is given to individuals age 35 and under for their talents in art and knowledge, but also for being positive role models.

Autumn has assisted organizations like Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, This Bar Saves Lives, the Hurricane Sandy Relief Fund and encouraging art education as a participating artist in Turnaround Arts, a signature program for the Presidents’ Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

7. Britto represents the 2016 Summer Olympics

Romero Britto, Park West Gallery artist
Park West Gallery was pleased to announce that world-renowned artist Romero Britto was named an official ambassador for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, held in his home country of Brazil.

Britto revealed the news during a visit to Park West Gallery’s Miami Lakes location on Jan. 20. The Neo-pop artist was appointed to be a Brazilian ambassador for the 2016 Olympics by the Brazilian Olympic Committee.

As an ambassador, Britto was also nominated by Coca-Cola to carry the Olympic Torch when the games arrive. He will also team up with the soda company to create paintings, pins and bottles.

“As a Brazilian it is a wonderful feeling to be nominated as a Rio 2016 Olympic Torchbearer in my country,” Britto said.

8. Guy Harvey and the NCL Escape

Guy Harvey Park West Gallery

Guy Harvey (Photo courtesy of John Bell)

The gallery was thrilled to sign with Harvey not only because of his awe-inspiring marine life art, but his conservation efforts with the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation.

“This relationship will broaden the reach of my art for patrons and at the same time help spread the message for ocean conservation,” said Harvey, who in 2011 received the Simon Conservation Award from Artists for Conservation.

Harvey’s artwork is featured on the hull of Norwegian Cruise Line’s newest and largest ship, Escape, which set sail for its inaugural cruise on Nov. 14. He is the third Park West artist to have artwork featured on the hull of a ship, following Peter Max and Lebo.

9. Pangborn creates art for the White House Fellows

Dominic Pangborn White House Fellows

Artwork created by Dominic Pangborn for the White House Fellows’ 50th anniversary (Image courtesy of Carolyn Chin)

Dominic Pangborn attended the White House Fellows 2015 Leadership Conference on October 22-23 and gala on Oct. 24 in Washington, D.C., where he presented his artwork to the White House Fellows during their 50th anniversary celebration. The Art in Motion he created for the Fellows features a board covered in photos from the past 50 years of White House Fellows.

“It went well beyond any expectations,” Pangborn says. “The reception, visit to the White House, the gala dinner – I’ve never had so much appreciation and gratefulness.”

10. Unique exhibitions

Nano Lopez Park West Gallery

Park West Gallery hosted Nano Lopez’s largest exhibition to date in June.

Throughout the year, Park West Gallery held exhibitions at its location in Southfield, Michigan, many of which were the first time the artist was featured in their own show at the gallery. The exhibitions included artists such as Lebo, Pangborn, Tim Yanke and Marcus Glenn.

Of note was the Pino exhibition, was one of the largest single collections of Pino art in one place, and the Chris DeRubeis exhibition, which was the first-ever solo show at Park West Gallery offering his metal art.

Look forward to more exhibitions in 2016! 

Albert Scaglione featured on the Huffington Post

Park West Gallery founder and CEO Albert Scaglione and artist Autumn de Forest inside Park West Gallery's Southfield, Michigan Headquarters

Park West Gallery founder and CEO Albert Scaglione and artist Autumn de Forest inside Park West Gallery’s Southfield, Michigan Headquarters

In 1969, Albert Scaglione founded Park West Gallery, a company that would drastically change the way fine art was collected. In an interview on the Huffington Post, Park West Gallery‘s founder and CEO spoke about his passion for art, the sense of adventure he has fused into Park West and building an unrivaled experience around art collecting.

From a young age, Scaglione realized that art speaks to everyone, but many people feel too intimidated to enter the art world. He says even his own parents felt this way and never thought they could have artwork of their own. Scaglione set out to change this perception by founding Park West Gallery. Today, Park West Gallery spreads a love for art through 104 art galleries on cruise ships, providing an experience that is as memorable as the artwork.

I came from a middle class family and studied to be an engineer but art really became a constant pulling in my life. When I was 16 years old I applied for a job at an art gallery. I took the job and it was fascinating. I worked there for 2 summers. When I was in highschool I dressed in a suit everyday. I like suits, ties, fashion and shoes. I liked looking right. When I was at Wayne state, teaching engineering, I kept wandering over to where the artists were. I decided to leave teaching and open an art gallery.

Read the full interview on the Huffington Post

Detroit artist Tim Yanke reveals new works at Park West Gallery

Tim Yanke

“Headdress” (2015) by Tim Yanke.

Park West Gallery is proud to unveil brand new works from Birmingham artist Tim Yanke during its July exhibitions showcasing Detroit artists.

The second show in the gallery’s “Detroit’s Finest” series will showcase the abstract expressionistic artwork of Yanke from July 12-26 at its Southfield, Michigan location.

Yanke will appear during an opening reception on July 12 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. The public is invited to attend and are encouraged to RSVP.

One of the largest collections of Yanke’s works will be on display during his first-ever solo exhibition with Park West Gallery. Much of the art was created especially for the exhibition, giving collectors an opportunity to view Yanke artwork that has never before been seen by the public.

“To go ahead and have a solo show like this eight miles from where I grew up, was born and where I spent my life, it all comes around, it seems like one complete circle,” he says.

Yanke, the youngest of six children, was encouraged to pursue art while growing up in Detroit. He completed studies at the University of North Texas in 1986, and had his first exhibition at the age of 23. He worked as a graphic designer until 2007 when he decided to pursue art full-time, setting up a studio in Birmingham, Michigan.

David Gorman, Park West Gallery Director, says with clear influences of Klee, de Kooning, and Twombly, Yanke has succeeded in creating identifiable abstract works that incorporate elements of Americana and Native American iconography.

“With art history as a platform and a fearless approach to creating, Yanke manages to offer a new form of art that is simultaneously classic and innovative,” Gorman says.

Tim Yanke

“Dragonfly” (2014) by Tim Yanke.

Gallery attendees will see one of the most extensive Yanke collections ever shown in one venue, including some of the largest scale paintings he has created. Collectors can expect experimental works as well as Yanke’s iconic imagery, such as his dragonflies, headdresses and flag-themed “Yanke Doodles.”

“It seems like traditional paintings are always painted in their traditional colors,” Yanke says. “The Impressionists didn’t think that way – the Impressionists departed from traditional painting, and after centuries of painting they decided to start painting from within, and those colors are within all of us.”

Yanke enjoys using his talents to give back to charitable causes. For instance, he has donated “Yanke Doodle” artwork to over a dozen participants with Habitat for Humanity of Oakland County, and has assisted in raising funds for the Oakland Livingston Human Service Agency.

Park West artist Tim Yanke Habitat for Humanity

Yanke presents a “Yanke Doodle” to a Habitat for Humanity homeowner.

Yanke has the honor of being the official artist for the 2015 Amelia Island Jazz Festival in Florida. His largest work hangs in the luxurious Henry Autograph Collection hotel in Dearborn, Michigan.

Yanke’s exhibition is the second of three shows featuring Park West Detroit artists. His show was preceded by Marcus Glenn on June 28, and is followed by Dominic Pangborn on July 26.

Admission is complimentary to the public. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. For more information or to RSVP for the opening, call 248-354-2343 or visit www.parkwestgallery.com.

Marc Chagall: Points of Interest

Marc Chagall

Happy birthday to Marc Chagall! The artist, born July 7, 1887, is credited as being a pioneer of modern art with a style that borrowed from fauvism, expressionism and cubism, but cannot be pigeonholed into one category.

His dreamy works, whether of village life or Jewish rituals, continue to be the subject of study. He worked in everything from painting and drawing to mosaic, sculpture and lithography, his innovations in the latter setting new standards for fine art graphic works. In honor of the great artist’s birthday, we offer some facts you might find surprising about Chagall.

 Chagall measured his work against nature

Chagall is said to have judged the quality of his art by comparing it to “God-made” objects. He would hold up objects like a rock, tree branch or flower to his painting. In his words: “If the painting stands up beside a thing man cannot make, the painting is authentic. If there’s a clash between the two, it’s bad art.”

 

Picasso’s praise, Chagall’s jokes

chagall

pable_picasso_bw

An article from the Smithsonian tells us that Chagall and Pablo Picasso were friends and rivals. Picasso praised Chagall, saying: “I don’t know where he gets those images. . .He must have an angel in his head.” Meanwhile, Chagall is said to have made the joke: “What a genius, that Picasso…It’s a pity he doesn’t paint.”

The same article tells us that Chagall was often elusive, telling people “no” or “I don’t know” if they asked if he was the famous painter Marc Chagall.

Chagall narrowly escaped Nazi-occupied France

Chagall and his family didn’t initially flee France under Nazi Germany occupation, unaware that laws were being passed mandating the forced transfer of Jewish citizens to concentration camps. When they finally decided to escape, they were unable to afford passage to New York. Thankfully, the Chagalls were among the 2,000 artists and intellectuals who fled to the U.S. with the help of American journalist Varian Fry, who risked his life to run a smuggling operation.

His “La Bible” series took 25 years to complete

Marc Chagall

Chagall was commissioned by Ambroise Vollard to create illustrations based on the Bible in 1931. He decided to use the mediums of etching and engraving, creating 65 etchings from 1931 to 1939. However, Vollard’s death and the war spreading across Europe halted the project. In 1952, he resumed the project, creating 40 additional plates to complete the series in 1956. This is considered to be one of his most ambitious and important undertakings.

Chagall didn’t learn lithography until the age of 63

Marc Chagall

Chagall is credited with creating some of the most masterful works of color lithography from any artist, but he didn’t experiment with the medium until 1950 at the age of 63, two years after returning to France. Although a famous and talented artist, Chagall worked hard to master the printmaking medium, resulting in such works as his “Daphnis and Chloe” series.

Chagall was dedicated to the lithographic process and the layered use of color, causing his printmaker, Charles Sorlier, to remark: “It is in this way, to the surprise of certain publishers, that a plate begun in six colors can comprise twenty-five in its definitive version.”

Chagall’s lithography teacher became a lifelong friend

Chagall studied lithography under Sorlier, who entered Fernand Mourlot’s workshop in 1948. Sorlier worked with artists such as Henri Matisse, Picasso and Fernand Leger, but his relationship with Chagall was the most significant. They became great friends, so much so that Sorlier was one of the last people to visit Chagall before his death in 1985.

His painting of the Paris Opera ceiling was controversial

Chagall

At the age of 77, Chagall was commissioned to paint the ceiling of the Paris Opera. His critics argued that a modern artist, let alone a Russian Jewish artist, shouldn’t be the one to paint a French national monument. Despite this, he completed the work in a year, using a 2,400-square-foot canvas and 440 pounds of paint.

Take a look inside Marcus Glenn’s studio

Peek inside the 2014 Official Grammy artist’s Detroit studio and take a closer look in the space where Marcus Glenn’s work comes to life.

Examining Marcus Glenn’s epic portrait

Marcus Glenn Detroit

To celebrate his first show in his hometown in nearly 20 years, artist Marcus Glenn challenged himself by creating one of his largest works of art to date.

In honor of Park West Gallery’s “Detroit’s Finest” three-part exhibition series featuring Detroit artists, of which Glenn is the first, Glenn has stunned collectors with a massive work that is on display and available to collect.

Glenn considers himself a figurative abstract artist, and his medium of choice is actually a mix of paints, fabrics and other materials on wood panels. He has dubbed this style “Flat Life,” as the works are two-dimensional but pop with texture and color.

Glenn utilized this colorful style to create a unique 7-foot by 4-foot work, “Accurate Knowledge is Better than Imagination,” a wondrous self-portrait that sheds light on the artist’s soul. The title is a reversal of Albert Einstein’s quote, “imagination is more important than knowledge.”

“If we gain accurate knowledge, we can open our minds to great imagination,” Glenn explains.

Marcus Glenn Detroit

Like the painting’s title suggests, the more knowledge one has of it, the better one can understand it. Glenn depicts himself in his studio, standing next to an easel displaying the official artwork hecreated for the 56th Annual Grammy Awards. He says this represents one of the biggest moments in his career.

“At the time, I was going to entitle the piece ‘A Brush with Success,’ and that’s why I put my Grammy piece [in it],” he says. “It’s sitting in the center on the easel in my studio.”

Glenn, a left-handed artist, portrays a brush in his right hand and a Bible in his left. He says by placing the holy book in his dominant hand, he shows the significance it has in his life.

“I peer into God’s word, and it’s like a formula for life,” he says. “That is the most important aspect.”

Marcus Glenn Detroit

Glenn’s love for his family is apparent when examining the artwork. Propped against the easel’s legs is a framed painting of his wife, Yolanda. A cloth on the floor next to a painter’s palette comes from a dress his mother owned, alluding to her role in supporting his passion for art.

Yolanda’s mother, who passed away recently, is represented by using pants from her wardrobe used as Glenn’s pants in the painting, while Glenn’s green shirt is his son’s, who helps in the studio. One can even find little bees in the work representing Glenn’s four daughters.

“When you look at this, it’s a lot of emotion,” he says.

Marcus Glenn Detroit

Like many of Glenn’s works, multi-colored floorboards provide the foundation for the characters. The various colors represent “the palette of God,” and as Glenn says, God is love.

“You begin to see these slats, which for me it’s the foundation of my heart, which is love,” he says. “Once we as the human race master love, the world will truly be a better place.”

Like most of Glenn’s “Flat Life” artwork, seeing it in person is the best way to fully appreciate the textures and materials he incorporated in the 46 new works he created. Glenn’s exhibition will be on display for a limited time from June 28 to July 12.