We’ve Moved! Visit the New Park West Gallery Blog

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We’ve moved! We’ll no longer be updating this site, but Park West Gallery has just launched a NEW website, where you’ll find our blog. There, we’ll be sharing even more news + information about your favorite artists, gallery events and art world happenings.

Please visit http://www.parkwestgallery.com/blog. See you there!

Albert Scaglione featured on the Huffington Post

Park West Gallery founder and CEO Albert Scaglione and artist Autumn de Forest inside Park West Gallery's Southfield, Michigan Headquarters

Park West Gallery founder and CEO Albert Scaglione and artist Autumn de Forest inside Park West Gallery’s Southfield, Michigan Headquarters

In 1969, Albert Scaglione founded Park West Gallery, a company that would drastically change the way fine art was collected. In an interview on the Huffington Post, Park West Gallery‘s founder and CEO spoke about his passion for art, the sense of adventure he has fused into Park West and building an unrivaled experience around art collecting.

From a young age, Scaglione realized that art speaks to everyone, but many people feel too intimidated to enter the art world. He says even his own parents felt this way and never thought they could have artwork of their own. Scaglione set out to change this perception by founding Park West Gallery. Today, Park West Gallery spreads a love for art through 104 art galleries on cruise ships, providing an experience that is as memorable as the artwork.

I came from a middle class family and studied to be an engineer but art really became a constant pulling in my life. When I was 16 years old I applied for a job at an art gallery. I took the job and it was fascinating. I worked there for 2 summers. When I was in highschool I dressed in a suit everyday. I like suits, ties, fashion and shoes. I liked looking right. When I was at Wayne state, teaching engineering, I kept wandering over to where the artists were. I decided to leave teaching and open an art gallery.

Read the full interview on the Huffington Post

Detroit artist Tim Yanke reveals new works at Park West Gallery

Tim Yanke

“Headdress” (2015) by Tim Yanke.

Park West Gallery is proud to unveil brand new works from Birmingham artist Tim Yanke during its July exhibitions showcasing Detroit artists.

The second show in the gallery’s “Detroit’s Finest” series will showcase the abstract expressionistic artwork of Yanke from July 12-26 at its Southfield, Michigan location.

Yanke will appear during an opening reception on July 12 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. The public is invited to attend and are encouraged to RSVP.

One of the largest collections of Yanke’s works will be on display during his first-ever solo exhibition with Park West Gallery. Much of the art was created especially for the exhibition, giving collectors an opportunity to view Yanke artwork that has never before been seen by the public.

“To go ahead and have a solo show like this eight miles from where I grew up, was born and where I spent my life, it all comes around, it seems like one complete circle,” he says.

Yanke, the youngest of six children, was encouraged to pursue art while growing up in Detroit. He completed studies at the University of North Texas in 1986, and had his first exhibition at the age of 23. He worked as a graphic designer until 2007 when he decided to pursue art full-time, setting up a studio in Birmingham, Michigan.

David Gorman, Park West Gallery Director, says with clear influences of Klee, de Kooning, and Twombly, Yanke has succeeded in creating identifiable abstract works that incorporate elements of Americana and Native American iconography.

“With art history as a platform and a fearless approach to creating, Yanke manages to offer a new form of art that is simultaneously classic and innovative,” Gorman says.

Tim Yanke

“Dragonfly” (2014) by Tim Yanke.

Gallery attendees will see one of the most extensive Yanke collections ever shown in one venue, including some of the largest scale paintings he has created. Collectors can expect experimental works as well as Yanke’s iconic imagery, such as his dragonflies, headdresses and flag-themed “Yanke Doodles.”

“It seems like traditional paintings are always painted in their traditional colors,” Yanke says. “The Impressionists didn’t think that way – the Impressionists departed from traditional painting, and after centuries of painting they decided to start painting from within, and those colors are within all of us.”

Yanke enjoys using his talents to give back to charitable causes. For instance, he has donated “Yanke Doodle” artwork to over a dozen participants with Habitat for Humanity of Oakland County, and has assisted in raising funds for the Oakland Livingston Human Service Agency.

Park West artist Tim Yanke Habitat for Humanity

Yanke presents a “Yanke Doodle” to a Habitat for Humanity homeowner.

Yanke has the honor of being the official artist for the 2015 Amelia Island Jazz Festival in Florida. His largest work hangs in the luxurious Henry Autograph Collection hotel in Dearborn, Michigan.

Yanke’s exhibition is the second of three shows featuring Park West Detroit artists. His show was preceded by Marcus Glenn on June 28, and is followed by Dominic Pangborn on July 26.

Admission is complimentary to the public. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. For more information or to RSVP for the opening, call 248-354-2343 or visit www.parkwestgallery.com.

Marc Chagall: Points of Interest

Marc Chagall

Happy birthday to Marc Chagall! The artist, born July 7, 1887, is credited as being a pioneer of modern art with a style that borrowed from fauvism, expressionism and cubism, but cannot be pigeonholed into one category.

His dreamy works, whether of village life or Jewish rituals, continue to be the subject of study. He worked in everything from painting and drawing to mosaic, sculpture and lithography, his innovations in the latter setting new standards for fine art graphic works. In honor of the great artist’s birthday, we offer some facts you might find surprising about Chagall.

 Chagall measured his work against nature

Chagall is said to have judged the quality of his art by comparing it to “God-made” objects. He would hold up objects like a rock, tree branch or flower to his painting. In his words: “If the painting stands up beside a thing man cannot make, the painting is authentic. If there’s a clash between the two, it’s bad art.”


Picasso’s praise, Chagall’s jokes



An article from the Smithsonian tells us that Chagall and Pablo Picasso were friends and rivals. Picasso praised Chagall, saying: “I don’t know where he gets those images. . .He must have an angel in his head.” Meanwhile, Chagall is said to have made the joke: “What a genius, that Picasso…It’s a pity he doesn’t paint.”

The same article tells us that Chagall was often elusive, telling people “no” or “I don’t know” if they asked if he was the famous painter Marc Chagall.

Chagall narrowly escaped Nazi-occupied France

Chagall and his family didn’t initially flee France under Nazi Germany occupation, unaware that laws were being passed mandating the forced transfer of Jewish citizens to concentration camps. When they finally decided to escape, they were unable to afford passage to New York. Thankfully, the Chagalls were among the 2,000 artists and intellectuals who fled to the U.S. with the help of American journalist Varian Fry, who risked his life to run a smuggling operation.

His “La Bible” series took 25 years to complete

Marc Chagall

Chagall was commissioned by Ambroise Vollard to create illustrations based on the Bible in 1931. He decided to use the mediums of etching and engraving, creating 65 etchings from 1931 to 1939. However, Vollard’s death and the war spreading across Europe halted the project. In 1952, he resumed the project, creating 40 additional plates to complete the series in 1956. This is considered to be one of his most ambitious and important undertakings.

Chagall didn’t learn lithography until the age of 63

Marc Chagall

Chagall is credited with creating some of the most masterful works of color lithography from any artist, but he didn’t experiment with the medium until 1950 at the age of 63, two years after returning to France. Although a famous and talented artist, Chagall worked hard to master the printmaking medium, resulting in such works as his “Daphnis and Chloe” series.

Chagall was dedicated to the lithographic process and the layered use of color, causing his printmaker, Charles Sorlier, to remark: “It is in this way, to the surprise of certain publishers, that a plate begun in six colors can comprise twenty-five in its definitive version.”

Chagall’s lithography teacher became a lifelong friend

Chagall studied lithography under Sorlier, who entered Fernand Mourlot’s workshop in 1948. Sorlier worked with artists such as Henri Matisse, Picasso and Fernand Leger, but his relationship with Chagall was the most significant. They became great friends, so much so that Sorlier was one of the last people to visit Chagall before his death in 1985.

His painting of the Paris Opera ceiling was controversial


At the age of 77, Chagall was commissioned to paint the ceiling of the Paris Opera. His critics argued that a modern artist, let alone a Russian Jewish artist, shouldn’t be the one to paint a French national monument. Despite this, he completed the work in a year, using a 2,400-square-foot canvas and 440 pounds of paint.

Take a look inside Marcus Glenn’s studio

Peek inside the 2014 Official Grammy artist’s Detroit studio and take a closer look in the space where Marcus Glenn’s work comes to life.

Examining Marcus Glenn’s epic portrait

Marcus Glenn Detroit

To celebrate his first show in his hometown in nearly 20 years, artist Marcus Glenn challenged himself by creating one of his largest works of art to date.

In honor of Park West Gallery’s “Detroit’s Finest” three-part exhibition series featuring Detroit artists, of which Glenn is the first, Glenn has stunned collectors with a massive work that is on display and available to collect.

Glenn considers himself a figurative abstract artist, and his medium of choice is actually a mix of paints, fabrics and other materials on wood panels. He has dubbed this style “Flat Life,” as the works are two-dimensional but pop with texture and color.

Glenn utilized this colorful style to create a unique 7-foot by 4-foot work, “Accurate Knowledge is Better than Imagination,” a wondrous self-portrait that sheds light on the artist’s soul. The title is a reversal of Albert Einstein’s quote, “imagination is more important than knowledge.”

“If we gain accurate knowledge, we can open our minds to great imagination,” Glenn explains.

Marcus Glenn Detroit

Like the painting’s title suggests, the more knowledge one has of it, the better one can understand it. Glenn depicts himself in his studio, standing next to an easel displaying the official artwork hecreated for the 56th Annual Grammy Awards. He says this represents one of the biggest moments in his career.

“At the time, I was going to entitle the piece ‘A Brush with Success,’ and that’s why I put my Grammy piece [in it],” he says. “It’s sitting in the center on the easel in my studio.”

Glenn, a left-handed artist, portrays a brush in his right hand and a Bible in his left. He says by placing the holy book in his dominant hand, he shows the significance it has in his life.

“I peer into God’s word, and it’s like a formula for life,” he says. “That is the most important aspect.”

Marcus Glenn Detroit

Glenn’s love for his family is apparent when examining the artwork. Propped against the easel’s legs is a framed painting of his wife, Yolanda. A cloth on the floor next to a painter’s palette comes from a dress his mother owned, alluding to her role in supporting his passion for art.

Yolanda’s mother, who passed away recently, is represented by using pants from her wardrobe used as Glenn’s pants in the painting, while Glenn’s green shirt is his son’s, who helps in the studio. One can even find little bees in the work representing Glenn’s four daughters.

“When you look at this, it’s a lot of emotion,” he says.

Marcus Glenn Detroit

Like many of Glenn’s works, multi-colored floorboards provide the foundation for the characters. The various colors represent “the palette of God,” and as Glenn says, God is love.

“You begin to see these slats, which for me it’s the foundation of my heart, which is love,” he says. “Once we as the human race master love, the world will truly be a better place.”

Like most of Glenn’s “Flat Life” artwork, seeing it in person is the best way to fully appreciate the textures and materials he incorporated in the 46 new works he created. Glenn’s exhibition will be on display for a limited time from June 28 to July 12.

Marcus Glenn the Grammy Artist

Marcus Glenn Grammy Detroit

Marcus and Yolanda Glenn at the Grammy Museum.

Imagine receiving a phone call from the officials who run the Grammy Awards – music’s biggest night – telling you that you’re the official artist for their upcoming show.

For Marcus Glenn, the first of three artists featured in the “Detroit’s Finest” series of Park West Gallery exhibitions this summer, he doesn’t have to imagine – he lived it!

On December 17, 2013, the Recording Academy selected the Detroit native to create the official artwork for the 56th Annual Grammy Awards. The ceremony was held January 26, 2014, in Los Angeles. Now, over a year later, Glenn humbly – but fondly – recalls the experience and the impact it had on his artwork.

“The Grammys want you to represent music’s biggest night, so for me it was a big honor and truly an exciting moment in my career as a professional artist,” he says.

Glenn says the only limitation he had in creating the official artwork was that he had to use the iconic gramophone. Glenn’s artwork, “One Nite Outta This World,” is an acrylic on wood mixed media that depicts the Grammy’s gramophone floating in space, surrounded by planets and blasting colorful sounds.

A floating piano keyboard, peppered with colorful keys, twists and turns like a ribbon until the keys break away. Glenn says the keys represent music no longer belonging to a musician, and entering the universe to impact those that hear it.

Marcus Glenn Grammy Detroit

Marcus Glenn’s “One Nite Outta This World” was the official artwork for the 56th Annual Grammy Awards.

The artwork was featured on posters, tickets, T-shirts and other official materials for the event, including the programs carried around by attendees.

“We got to California, and the image was plastered everywhere,” he says. “I really started feeling like a star.”

Park West Gallery CEO and Founder Albert Scaglione and his wife, Mitsie, had the pleasure of attending the awards show with Glenn and his wife, Yolanda. Albert remarked that the selection of a musically-inspired artist like Glenn was perfect for the Grammy awards.

“It’s an exciting opportunity for Marcus and is yet another example of the depth of talent that’s right here in Detroit,” he said.

Glenn says he had some competition for the Grammy art in the form of The Beatles. He says the famous band wanted the Grammy cover because it was their 50th anniversary of being introduced to the American market, and he actually had the chance to talk with Ringo Starr about it at the event.

He says at first, Starr was grim about it, saying they had wanted the cover and that Glenn had “beat” them, but admitted to Glenn that they liked his artwork.

“That was a great experience for me to have my little battle with the Beatles,” Glenn says with a laugh.

As the official artist, Glenn was invited to celebrate at a Grammy event as well as attend the award show. The Glenns attended in style – to honor the occasion, Glenn made a custom purse featuring his artwork for Yolanda to carry as they made their way down the red carpet.

Marcus Glenn Grammy Detroit

Nite the Carpet was Red” (2014), Marcus Glenn. From the 56th Grammy Awards Series.

Attending such a spectacular event is bound to leave an impression, and Glenn was no exception. Glenn created his “Grammy 2014 series,” including “Key Steps to the Grammys” and “The Nite the Stars Felt Closer” based on his experiences.

“I was inspired to do pieces that reflect on the moment of just being on the red carpet and the whole experience,” Glenn says. “I had to come down off that natural high.”

Michigan was more than happy to celebrate alongside Glenn, from interviews with Detroit media outlets to recognition from local dignitaries. Representatives such as Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson, Southfield Mayor Brenda Lawrence and Southfield City Council President Sylvia Jordan commended Glenn for his accomplishments. Glenn was even invited to throw the opening pitch at a Detroit Tigers game.

Park West Gallery announces 3-part Detroit exhibition with Marcus Glenn

Marcus Glenn

Park West Gallery, the host of fine art auctions on cruise ships, live art auctions in major metropolitan areas and via art gallery locations in Detroit and Miami Lakes, Florida, will showcase the art of Detroit artist Marcus Glenn.

Park West Gallery presents the first in its three-part exhibition, “Detroit’s Finest,” from June 28 to July 12 at its Southfield, Michigan location. A free opening reception with Glenn will be held 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on June 28.

Glenn, a Detroit native, became the first African-American and youngest cartoonist in the “Detroit News” with his comic strip, “Double Trouble.” Glenn was commissioned by Daimler-Chrysler to create a mural, and has a painting in the permanent collection of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit.

Glenn’s artwork, “One Nite Outta This World,” was chosen as the official art for the 56th Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Glenn also served as the official artist of the 2014 Amelia Island Jazz Festival.

“After traveling the world with Park West Gallery for almost 20 years, it’s exciting to have an opening here in my hometown,” says Glenn.

Glenn is known for combining painting and sculpture in a bas-relief effect he calls “Flat Life.” His use of bright colors, paper and fabric create textured works of art that resemble collages. Much of his imagery is drawn from his love of jazz music and creating a connection between art and the viewer.

“Glenn’s three-dimensional, musically themed works are a feast for the senses,” says David Gorman, Gallery Director for Park West Gallery. “One can almost hear the improvisational jazz composition reverberating off the surface.”

The Glenn exhibition will be the first of three featuring Park West Detroit artists. An exhibition featuring Tim Yanke will open July 12, and on July 26, Park West will showcase Dominic Pangborn. Refreshments will be served at each opening. Attendees are encouraged to RSVP.

Admission is free to the public. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. For more information, call 248-354-2343 or visit www.parkwestgallery.com.

Park West Gallery in Detroit connects artists to fine art aficionados via land and sea art auctions by creating an entertaining, educational and welcoming environment that ignites a passion for the arts.

Albert Scaglione in the Huffington Post

Albert Scaglione

Supportive parents, a love of art, and an attitude of working harder than anyone else are just some of the reasons Park West Gallery Founder and CEO Albert Scaglione gives for succeeding in the art world.

The Huffington Post recently published an article profiling Scaglione and how he made the decision to leave a career in teaching and rocket science to pursue his passion for art, which led to the formation of Park West Gallery, the “largest art dealer in the world” of original artwork.

Nova Lorraine, editor-in-chief of Raine Magazine, shares what she learned after having a one-on-one with the CEO about working with artists like Yaacov Agam and Peter Max, and what influences him as an entrepreneur.

From the article:

Discovering new masters and finding pieces of the old masters, Scaglione is like an Indiana Jones of the art world. Today, alongside his wife, Mitsie Scaglione, Albert has had an opportunity to make an impact in the industry. For example, Park West currently has one of the largest collections of Picasso graphics, all of which have been built through auction houses such as Sotheby’s and more. Read More…

Outside of the art world, the article notes that the Scaglione family is just as passionate about giving back to their community through monetary gifts and donations of art.