Category Archives: Rembrandt van Rijn

Own a Piece of Art History with the Holiday Sale

Have you ever been in a museum admiring artwork by a master artist and thought, “What would it be like to own this? How would it look in my living room or study?”

Owning artwork by an old or contemporary master is a privilege and joy that cannot be compared. Collectors can experience this joy for themselves with Park West Gallery’s Holiday Sale, featuring works by some of history’s greatest artists.

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669)

"Jan Antonides van der Linden, Physician" (1665), Rembrandt van Rijn Park West Gallery

Jan Antonides van der Linden, Physician” (1665), Rembrandt van Rijn. B., Holl. 264; BB. 65-1

Rembrandt is considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art. The artistic genius is known for his mastery of painting, printmaking and draftsmanship. During his lifetime, the Dutch artist earned the reputation of being the greatest etcher in history.

Rembrandt’s “Jan Antonides van der Linden, Physician” is the artist’s last-known etching, created four years before his death. The image was intended to be used for the frontispiece (an illustration facing the title page of a book) of an edition of writings by Hippocrates. The publisher rejected it, as they required an engraving instead of an etching.

 

Francisco Goya (1773-1812)

"Se aprovechan" (They make use of them), (1810-1820), Francisco Goya Park West Gallery

Se aprovechan” (They make use of them), (1810-1820), Francisco Goya. Delteil 135; Harris 136

Goya is classified as the last of the Old Masters – skilled artists who worked in Europe before 1800 – and the first of the modern artists. The Spanish romantic painter and printmaker is considered the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. He worked as a court painter for Spanish royalty.

Goya suffered from an unknown disease in 1792 that left him deaf. Following this, his artwork became bleak and dark. This theme carried into his collection of 82 prints, “The Disasters of War.” The collection represents his visualization of, and protests against, the atrocities of war in the early 1800s. “Se aprovechan” (They Make Use of Them) shows one such horror – soldiers stripping the dead of clothing.

 

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)

pablo picasso, park west gallery, suite vollard

Faune Devoilant une Femme” by Pablo Picasso.

Picasso is one of the most renowned artists in the world. The Spanish artist is regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, having co-founded important movements like Cubism and also the medium of collage, and contributing to the development of mediums such as painting, sculpting and printmaking.

Faune Devoilant une Femme” (The Faun Unveiling a Woman) is part of the Vollard Suite, a collection of 100 etchings by Picasso. This etching is the largest and one of the most celebrated of the Vollard works. The imagery is based on Rembrandt’s etching, “Jupiter and Antiope,” which was inspired by the myth about the Roman god Jupiter’s seduction of a princess. The artwork is said to be Picasso’s acknowledgement of the end of his passionate relationship with Marie-Thérèse Walter.

 

Marc Chagall (1887-1985)

Chagall, Marc (after) Femme de Cirque 1960 Park West Gallery

Femme de Cirque” (1960), Marc Chagall (after)

Chagall created artwork in nearly every format, and is a pioneer of modern art who revolutionized the medium of lithography. The Russian-French artist is counted as one of the most significant Jewish artists of the 20th century.

Park West Gallery’s Holiday Sale features a colorful Chagall lithograph titled “Femme de Cirque” (Circus Woman). Chagall once wrote: “Circus! A magical word, a centuries old entertainment parading before us, in which a tear, a smile, a gesture of arm or leg takes on the quality of great art.” This artwork depicts that sentiment by featuring a female acrobat holding her balance atop a bucking goat.

Celui qui dit les choses sans rien dire (Those who say things without saying) 1975-76 Cr. 99 Marc Chagall Park West Gallery

Celui qui dit les choses sans rien dire” (Those who say things without saying), (1975-76), Marc Chagall. Cr. 99

The second work is an etching, titled, “Celui qui dit les choses sans rien dire” (Those who say things without saying), originating from Chagall’s suite of 25 images that visualize the words of French poet Louis Aragon, a founding member of the Surrealist movement.

 

Joan Miró (1893-1983)

"Ronde Nuit" (Night Watch), (1970), Joan Miro. M. 672; C. books 134 Park West Gallery

Ronde Nuit” (Night Watch), (1970), Joan Miro. M. 672; C. books 134

Andre Breton, a founder of Surrealism, called Miró “the most Surrealist of us all.” Miró earned international acclaim for his re-creation of the childlike mindset in his art. The Spanish painter, sculptor and ceramicist developed his style based on Catalan folk art, using organic forms, flattened planes and sharp lines.

The above color lithograph, “Ronde Nuit” (Night Watch), is taken from a catalog for an exposition of Miró sculptures. The artwork may be referencing Rembrandt’s famous painting, “The Night Watch.” With its abstract forms, one can find multiple interpretations of “Rone Nuit.” For example, the black and red shape on the right could be a night watchman armed with a crossbow.

 

Marcel Mouly (1918-2008)

Mouly, Marcel Le Compotier Rouge 1978 Park West Gallery

Le Compotier Rouge” (1978), Marcel Mouly

The boldly-colored, semi-abstract art of French artist Mouly is found in the permanent collections of over 20 museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in Paris. He studied with masters of modern art, including Picasso and Chagall, earning a reputation as one of the most important artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Park West Gallery offers the chance to own a unique oil painting by Mouly, “Le Compotier Rouge” (translated literally to be “The Red Fruit Dish”). When examining the painting, it is apparent Mouly was deeply influenced by Picasso’s Cubism and Henri Matisse’s Fauvism. Mouly’s connection to the leaders of modern art is even more apparent when one discovers that his art was shown alongside art by Matisse in Paris in 1945.

Contact our gallery consultants at (800) 521-9654 ext. 4 or sales@parkwestgallery.com  to learn more about collecting art from the masters.

Celebrating Mother’s Day with 7 artists

Mother’s Day is all about celebrating motherhood and maternal bonds, whether it is one’s own mom, grandmother, sister or other loved one. Read on to see how some of the Park West Gallery artists, past and present, have celebrated mothers through their artwork.

Itzchak Tarkay

Mother's Day Itchak Tarkay

“Mother And Daughter” (2007) by Itzchak Tarkay.

Itzchak Tarkay, the master acrylic painter, watercolorist and graphic artist, portrayed women throughout his oeuvre. His “natural woman” spoke to the depth and complexity of women, and shows her as satisfied, calm, and serene. In our Mother’s Day art, Tarkay depicts a gathering where a mother and daughter share a quiet moment together.

 

Rembrandt van Rijn

Mother's Day Rembrandt

“Artist’s Mother with her Hand on her Chest” (1631) by Rembrandt.

Rembrandt immortalized his mother in etchings as well as in several paintings. In the above etching, Rembrandt demonstrates his use of “psychological portraiture,” which captures more than the subject’s likeness, but their humanity and spirituality. Hints of what she was like might be gleaned from Rembrandt’s works, as he depicted her as a prophetess, reading a book, or playing a role in religious imagery.

 

Linda Le Kinff

Mother's Day Linda Le Kinff

“New Mother” (2014) by Linda Le Kinff.

Thanks to her powerful colors and warm scenes, collectors find themselves connecting to the artwork of Linda Le Kinff. In this mixed media painting, Le Kinff expresses the indescribable feelings and emotions of motherhood as a new mother cradles her child. Le Kinff’s works capture a myriad of scenes, whether it’s music or intimate moments in the lives of her subjects.

 

Hua Chen

Mother's Day Hua Chen

“Mother and Daughter” (2012) by Hua Chen.

Hua Chen’s delicate style is perfect for portraying the female figure without seeming provocative. A perfect example of this is seen in this oil painting of mother and child spending time together at the beach. Like the love of a mother, Chen’s subjects are calming, subtle and ageless.

 

Maya Green

Mother's Day Maya Green

“Mother Nature” (2014) by Maya Green.

In a slightly different vein, Mother’s Day can be about celebrating the wonders of Mother Nature, as seen in this floral painting by Maya Green. She says she seeks to break down life to its visual essentials, such as light, dark, balance and movement, and “capturing the essence of a moment.”

 

Pino

Mother's Day Pino

“Long Day” (2005) by Pino.

Pino grew up in Italy surrounded by women – whether it was sisters, aunts or his mother – and in turn, he recognized their physical and spiritual beauty. Pino illustrated sensual, attractive women on book covers, but switched to creating works of fine art in the early 1990s. For Mother’s Day, examine how his mastery of technique and figure portrays the loving care of a mother with her child.

Learn more about Pino at our free exhibition, “Pino: An American Master,” which runs until May 17.

 

Andrew Bone

Mother's Day Andrew Bone

“A Family Affair” (2012) by Andrew Bone.

Of course, humans aren’t the only ones that appreciate their mothers, as seen in the artwork by wildlife painter Andrew Bone. The Zimbabwe native personally photographs the animals he renders onto canvas, giving him a first-hand look at how animals interact with one another, including this family of cheetahs under the watchful eye of their mother.

 

Interested in collecting any of the artwork seen here? Click here for information on how to contact our sales department.

Around Town: Rembrandt at the DIA, Cranbrook’s Grand Reopening, U of M’s ‘Face of Our Time’

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Need a break from stressful holiday shopping? Here are a few local art exhibits worth checking out this weekend…

cranbrook art museum, park west galleryNO OBJECT IS AN ISLAND: NEW DIALOGUES WITH THE CRANBROOK COLLECTION
The first exhibition in the Cranbrook Art Museum’s newly redesigned building highlights works once forgotten in closed storage. Pieces by 50 leading contemporary artists and designers are juxtaposed in challenging ways, providing insightful pairings to depict their similarities. Museum director and co-curator, Gregory Wittkopp, notes that some of these pieces have never been on display before, making this an exhibition you don’t want to miss.

When: Nov. 11, 2011 – March 25, 2012
Where: Cranbrook Art Museum
Website: www.cranbrookart.edu/museum

Face of Our Time, University of Michigan, Park West GalleryFACE OF OUR TIME
Five photographers – Jacob Aue Sobol, Jim Goldberg, Zanele Muholi, Daniel Schwartz, and Richard Misrach – document five different perspectives on contemporary culture. From Sobol’s interpretations of life in the Arctic to Misrach’s photographs in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, each artist sheds light in a discerning, provoking way, commenting on the development of pop culture today.

When: Nov. 12, 2011 – Feb. 5, 2012
Where: University of Michigan Museum of Art
Website: www.umma.umich.edu

Detroit Institute of Arts, Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus, Park West GalleryREMBRANDT AND THE FACE OF JESUS
For the first time ever, 64 of Rembrandt’s paintings, prints, and drawings come together in a study of the artist’s unique style as he depicts the face of Jesus. Against the grain for his time, Rembrandt humanized Christ in the mode of popular 17th century culture, rather than representing him in the popular, glorified manner, as a chiseled Greek god. In this series, guests will have the ability to follow Rembrandt’s progress through the years, beginning with a heroic, godlike representation then shifting to his break with tradition.

When: Nov. 20, 2011 – Feb. 12, 2012
Where: The Detroit Institute of Arts
Website: www.dia.org

To learn even more about the artist and his work, visit the Park West Gallery Rembrandt Collection at http://rembrandt.parkwestgallery.com.

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And if you’re in the neighborhood this weekend, stop by for a visit! Park West Gallery will be open Friday, 9am – 6pm and Saturday, 11 am – 6 pm [map].

‘Rembrandt in America’ at the North Carolina Museum of Art

On loan from Park West Gallery, Rembrandt’s “Millennium” etching, “Self Portrait Drawing at a Window,” is now on view at the “Rembrandt in America” exhibition at the North Carolina Museum of Art

Rembrandt in America, North Carolina Museum of Art, Park West Gallery, Millennium etchings In June of 2009, Park West Gallery and the family of its founder and CEO, Albert Scaglione, placed on loan eight original Rembrandt copper plates along with a set of the etchings printed from them (known as the “Millennium” editions), to the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. NCMA was chosen for this loan as these eight copper plates and 70 other surviving Rembrandt copper plates had been deposited on loan there years ago after they were purchased by Dr. Robert Lee Humber in 1938.

The “Self Portrait Drawing at a Window” etching from the Park West loan is now on display and featured in the current exhibition, “Rembrandt in America” which runs until January 22, 2012 in the East Building Meymandi Exhibition Gallery. The eight original copper plates have been installed since 2009 in the Circle of Rembrandt Gallery in the West Building and are regularly there on display. NCMA and its fellow organizers, the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, according to its exhibition announcement, “Have assembled a diverse yet representative group of pictures highlighting issues associated with the collecting and connoisseurship… of Rembrandt paintings in America.”

“Park West was delighted to bring the ‘Millennium’ copper plates back to Raleigh and the museum was delighted to receive the loan,” said Morris Shapiro, Park West Gallery Director and the individual who hand-carried the plates from the printer’s studio in New York to the museum in 2009. “It was one of the highlights of my career to bring these historical treasures from the hands of the master printer who had printed the ‘Millennium’ edition, and place them back into the hands of the museum from where they had rested for so many decades. It’s wonderful that so many people have had the opportunity to view the original copper plates and now to see this important etching in this exhibition.”

› For more information on the “Rembrandt in America” exhibition, visit http://ncartmuseum.org/exhibitions/rembrandt, or to download the exhibition gallery guide [pdf] click here.

› For more information on the “Millennium Edition” etchings and the Park West Gallery Rembrandt Collection, visit http://rembrandt.parkwestgallery.com.

Park West Rembrandt House Tour – Part Three

Rembrandt van Rijn (July 15, 1606 – October 4, 1669) was born 404 years ago today! Celebrate the birthday of one of history’s masters by watching Part 3 of the Park West Rembrandt House Tour…

The final part of the Park West Gallery Rembrandt House Tour is perhaps the most informative. Few people know that Rembrandt was a master etcher of his time and worked tirelessly to revolutionize the medium of etching.

During part three of the tour, join Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro for a demonstration of Rembrandt’s process, using the actual tools and materials utilized by the artist in his day to create his sublime etchings.

WATCH PART 1 »
WATCH PART 2 »

Visit the Park West Gallery YouTube Channel to view more art-related videos!

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Park West Visits Rembrandt House in Amsterdam – Part 2

Morris Shapiro, Park West Gallery Rembrandt van Rijn
Park West Director Morris Shapiro at the Rembrandt House in Amsterdam, June 2010.

Park West President, Marc Scaglione; Gallery Director, Morris Shapiro and staff escorted approximately 70 Park West clients through a private tour of the house in Amsterdam in June. Included in the tour were visits to Rembrandt’s painting studio (see photo above), his meeting room for his clients, bedroom, kitchen, cabinet, printing room for etchings and a gallery featuring a part of the Rembrandt House etching collection (which includes over 300 etchings). The house located on Jodenbreestraat, which coincidentally was built in 1606, the same year Rembrandt was born, was purchased in 1906 by a foundation set up to establish the museum which was opened three years later. The Rembrandt House is a “reconstruction” of his living and working environment, as Rembrandt’s possessions were liquidated in his bankruptcy of 1656. However, due to the meticulous inventory prepared by the bankruptcy court and Rembrandt’s own drawings of his home and studios, the house has been reassembled with painstaking detail and reproductions of 17th century furniture, tools, painting materials and even a hand-turned flat bed etching press.

“It’s hard to really appreciate the substantial genius Rembrandt possessed,” says Morris Shapiro. “When one has the opportunity to observe his living and working spaces, examine the kinds of tools he used, and stand in the room where some of the greatest paintings created in the history of art were born, one can begin to absorb what he accomplished. For me, as a life long devotee to art history and deep fan of Rembrandt’s paintings and prints, to stand in that space was a special moment. Just to see the types of limitations he overcame everyday is astonishing—he had to mix and create his own paints; he stored them in pig’s bladders to keep them from drying up. In the photo of me in the painting studio you can see a window behind me at the top left. Rembrandt would manipulate the drapery lifted above that window to control the amount of light that would illuminate his model. His use of light is of course legendary and Rembrandt is synonymous with the notion of ‘chiaroscuro,’ the strong and dramatic contrast of light and shadow, so experiencing that space and comprehending his method was such a powerful experience for me, and one that I will never forget. I am so glad we were able to share the experience with some of our clients.”

In 2008, Shapiro and Marc Scaglione were toured through the Rembrandt House by Leonore van Sloten, Assistant Curator of the museum and their tour was videotaped. Included in the video is a demonstration of the process Rembrandt used to print his etchings, and an etching plate is printed on a reproduction of a 17th Century etching press in the manner Rembrandt used.

The video is now available to view and we encourage anyone interested in learning more about the master of the Baroque age, and undoubtedly the greatest etcher of all time, to view it at the Park West Gallery YouTube Channel.

WATCH PART 1 »
WATCH PART 3 »

For more information on Rembrandt’s life please visit the Park West Gallery Rembrandt website .
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Take the Rembrandt House Museum Video Tour

Take a video tour of the Rembrandt House Museum in Amsterdam! Part One (which can be viewed below) explores the living and business areas. Stay tuned for parts two and three of this fascinating video series…

Join Park West Gallery President Marc Scaglione and Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro for a guided tour of the Rembrandt House Museum in Amsterdam. Glimpses into both living and business areas are provided as well as insights into the day-to-day life and activities of the master and his students. In addition to being a painter, Rembrandt was also a master etcher and an art dealer.

WATCH PART 2 »
WATCH PART 3 »

Visit the Park West Gallery YouTube Channel to view more art-related videos!

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The Magic of Rembrandt Paintings Revealed

Rembrandt's Saint James The Greater, 1661. (Lefteris Pitarakis/Associated Press)

Rembrandt's Saint James The Greater, 1661. (Lefteris Pitarakis/Associated Press)

While studying paintings created by Rembrandt van Rijn using software that examined lighting and spatial layout, University of British Columbia researcher Steve DiPaola uncovered how the Dutch master created his enduring works of art – through a technique that guides the viewer’s gaze.

According to DiPaola, Rembrandt’s technique was to paint a sharper focus on certain areas of a piece in order to draw the viewer’s eyes to that area. The study found that viewers would rest on the sharper areas longer, which resulted in a calming effect and also guided the viewer around the painting.

“This is about unlocking the puzzle of perception,” DiPaola told The Vancouver Sun newspaper. “Artists don’t always get the credit for it, but the way they make their magic is by exploiting brain science.”

By making certain details sharper and helping the viewer experience the painting, Rembrandt essentially created a narrative for his pieces. Whether Rembrandt actually knew what he was doing is still a question, but DiPaola feels the artist may have also intuitively done it. [Via CBC News]

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While Rembrandt is most widely known for his masterful paintings, he is also recognized as one of the best – if not the best – etcher of all time. For more information on the Park West Rembrandt Collection and the etching process in general, visit the Park West Gallery Rembrandt Website.

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