Tag Archives: paintings

‘Marc Chagall’ at the Nassau County Museum of Art

“If we had nothing of Chagall but his Bible,
he would be for us a great modern artist.”
—Meyer Schapiro, Art Historian, Columbia University

“The Bible is life, an echo of nature,
and this
is the secret I have endeavored to transmit.”
—Marc Chagall

"Projet de couverture non-utilisee; Bible" (1956), Marc Chagall, Park West Gallery

NEW YORK — Now through November 4, the Nassau County Museum of Art (NCMA) presents “Marc Chagall,” a major exhibition featuring significant paintings and a large selection from Chagall’s series of 105 hand-colored etchings of “Bible” stories (1957).

According to the museum:

The works selected demonstrate how Chagall, throughout a long and distinguished career, incorporated facets of his early Russian-Jewish heritage into multilayered works. Chagall’s storytelling paintings portray a fantastic pictorial world where heaven and earth seem to meet, and couples are always in love. It’s a world where people and animals—cows, goats, donkeys, horses and birds—float upside down or sideways, irrespective of the laws of gravity. Chagall’s hypersensitive imagination is palpable as he shares with the viewer his memories of family in brilliantly colored works set amidst the houses and streets of his native Vitebsk.

Over our 43 year history, Park West Gallery has assembled one of the most extensive collections of Marc Chagall artwork in existence. We are proud to have contributed various works from our collection to the NCMA for this exhibit.

“Marc Chagall” | July 21 – November 4, 2012
Nassau County Museum of Art
http://nassaumuseum.org

To learn more about the Park West Gallery Marc Chagall Collection, please visit www.parkwest-chagall.com.

August 10 in Art History – Louvre opens, Smithsonian established

Following is Park West Gallery’s roundup of important cultural events that took place on this day in art history.

On AUGUST 10 in ART HISTORY…

1793 – The Musée du Louvre opened to the public

Louvre Museum

On August 10, 1793, the Musée du Louvre opened to the public for the first time. This central landmark in Paris was originally established as “a national palace to house the king and for gathering together all the monuments of the sciences and the arts.” Opening day presented an exhibition of 537 works, mostly paintings from the collections of the French royal family and aristocrats. Today, the Louvre houses 35,000 works of art drawn from eight departments, displayed in over 60,000 square meters of exhibition space dedicated to the permanent collections.

1846 – The Smithsonian Institution was established

Smithsonian Institution

On August 10, 1846, U.S. Congress passed legislation founding the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, as an establishment dedicated to the “increase and diffusion of knowledge.” President James K. Polk signed it into law the same day. Today, the Smithsonian Institution is the world’s largest museum and research complex, including 19 museums and galleries and the National Zoological Park.

For more on this day in art history, visit the Park West Gallery Blog archives: Artist Birthdays – August 10
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Art News – June 24, 2011

vincent-and-theo-van-goghVincent van Gogh’s self-portrait (left) with the painting of his brother Theo (right)

Is he or isn’t he? Art researchers at Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum now believe that a work by Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh—long thought to have been a self-portrait—actually depicts the artist’s younger brother Theo. If true, it would be the only known painting of Theo, who supported Vincent financially and was his lifelong confidant and friend. What do you think—is it Vincent, or could it be Theo? {via CBS News}

QUIZ: Are you a Magritte geek? René Magritte: The Pleasure Principle opens today (thru Oct. 16) at Tate Liverpool. The Belgian surrealist is renowned for his witty images depicting everyday objects such as apples, bowler hats and pipes in unusual settings. How well do you know Magritte? Take the quiz{via Guardian}

On this day in art history: On June 24, 1901, Pablo Picasso‘s first major exhibition opened at a gallery on Rue Laffitte in Paris. The artist was 19 years old at the time, and unknown outside Barcelona, but had already produced hundreds of paintings. (Visit the Park West Gallery Picasso Website to learn even more about the artist.) {via History.com}

***Have an interesting art news story or upcoming arts event to share with our Park West Gallery Blog readers? Submit your art-related news links via email to marketing@parkwestgallery.com.

Art News – June 21, 2011

takashi murakami, google doodle, summer

June 21, 2011: ‘First day of Summer’ Google Doodle by Takashi Murakami

 

• An Artistic Start to Summer: Summer has officially begun! The Google search engine is welcoming the sunny season with a colorful home page doodle created by contemporary Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. (Also check out The Park West Gallery Summer Art Sale, now online.) {via Google}

• Picasso on View: Now through October 9, see Picasso: Masterpieces from the Musée National Picasso, Paris at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. The exhibition features more than 100 masterpieces by Pablo Picasso, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints from every phase of the artist’s career. {via de Young Museum}

Spotlight on Detroit: The city’s newest museum—featuring multi-media and light-based arts—is the first in the U.S. and second of its kind in the world. Kunsthalle Detroit (pronounced KOONST-hah-leh, or “art-hall” in German) is now open to the public. (And if you’re in the Detroit-area, be sure to stop by Park West Gallery for a visit!) {via The Detroit News}

***Have an interesting art news story or upcoming arts event to share with our Park West Gallery Blog readers? Submit your art-related news links via email to marketing@parkwestgallery.com.

Happy 118th Birthday Joan Miro [Video]

“You can look at a painting for a whole week and then never think about it again. You can also look at a painting for a second and think about it for the rest of your life.” —JOAN MIRO (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983)

Today marks the 118th birthday of Catalan artist Joan Miro, a man viewed by the art world and collectors as one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and the precursor for much of modern art.

(For an interactive timeline of the artist’s life and work, visit the Park West Gallery Joan Miro website »)

Joan Miro, Park West Gallery Collection

Now on view through September 11, Miro at Tate Modern is London’s first major retrospective of the artist’s works in nearly 50 years. Renowned as one of the greatest Surrealist painters, filling his paintings with luxuriant colour, Miró worked in a rich variety of styles. This is a rare opportunity to enjoy more than 150 paintings, drawings, sculptures and prints from moments across the six decades of his extraordinary career.

In the following video clip from Tate Modern, you’ll see vintage footage of Miro at work, go behind the scenes at his home and studio, and hear what scholars have to say about one of history’s greatest artists.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

For exhibit info, please visit www.tate.org.uk/modern/exhibitions/joanmiro
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The Joan Miro fine art collection is available at Park West Gallery cruise art auctions and through our gallery in Southfield, Michigan. Learn more about the artist and see examples of his work at www.parkwest-miro.com

Park West Gallery Spring Sale Collection – Now Online!

Park West Gallery Spring Fine Art Sale

Eclectic Park West Gallery collection features fine art, sports memorabilia, animation art and designer jewelry

With the spring season and all of its special days (Easter, Mother’s Day, and Graduations) right around the corner, the Park West Gallery Spring Collection was put together with all your gift giving needs in mind. The collection is currently featured online and boasts an array of fine artwork, high-end designer jewelry, sports memorabilia and animation at exciting sale prices, now through May 14.

More than 300 works from some of the world’s greatest artists are featured in the Spring Collection, including old and modern masters such as Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro, as well as contemporary artists like Dominic Pangborn, Scott Jacobs, Fanch Ledan, Peter Max, and Marcel Mouly. A variety of media are available including oil and acrylic paintings, watercolors and drawings, hand-signed limited edition etchings, lithographs, serigraphs and hand-embellished graphic works.

In addition to fine artwork, a portion of Park West Gallery’s expansive sports memorabilia collection of signed photographs and other collectibles are featured in the Spring Sale Collection. Also included in this offering are Japanese Woodcuts, which provide a glimpse into Japan’s rich history, and several items from Park West Gallery’s impressive animation art collection. Fine jewelry pieces from high-end designers are also featured, each work melding superb craftsmanship with a unique design.

The Park West Gallery Spring Sale Collection can be viewed online at http://sales.parkwestgallery.com. Knowledgeable art consultants are ready to assist callers toll-free at (800)-521-9654 ext 4 or (248)-354-2343.

Collectors can also browse the Spring Sale Collection in person at Park West Gallery, located at 29469 Northwestern Highway in Southfield, Michigan. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm and Saturday 11am – 6pm.

Alfred Gockel: Intention and Discovery

Written by Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro

Like a gifted musician, Alfred Gockel approaches his canvas.

Just as in Jazz, when he begins there is an underlying skeletal structure for the composition, but it must be fleshed out through instinct, sensitivity, experience and the ability to always be attuned to the “moment.” Musicians create the form of music through pitch, harmony, melody, rhythm, repetition, tone and dexterity with their instrument, honed by countless hours of practice and performance. The visual artist’s formal tools are equivalent: line, color, composition, spatial and proportional relationships, texture and surface and a mastery of draftsmanship gained only through the practiced repetition of capturing in two dimensions what eye perceives in three.

alfred gockel, park west gallery“Blowin’ the Blues” by Alfred Gockel
Park West Gallery Collection

For centuries, philosophers, historians, critics, artists and musicians themselves have pondered the relationship between the aural (musical) and the visual arts. Alfred Gockel just lives it.

When he paints (as seen in the Park West Gallery “stop-action” video of Gockel creating a painting), he seems to effortlessly apply his lines and forms, painting ambidextrously (a skill considered essential to Jazz drummers). But this belies the intense state of concentration that holds his attention. Gockel appears to instinctively select his colors, render and adjust his shapes and forms and freely move between his large brushes (for tonal areas) and his smaller ones (for detail). But, a closer look will reveal that his actions are a synthesis of instinct and determination, just like in Jazz: a delicate balance of intention and discovery.

Gockel has created his “performance paintings” all over the world and for years, essentially in his way, he has produced lasting “recordings” of his visual “music.” For Park West Gallery, he has created paintings before huge audiences at cruise ship art auctions, and at cruise ship gallery events. But his reach is not limited to art auctions at sea. He has exhibited and painted live from New York to Los Angeles, throughout Europe and in the Far East. Gockel is a restless soul, and his intention is to expose the entire world to his art and he pursues this goal tirelessly.

Alfred Gockel, Park West Gallery“Americana – The North Atlantic” by Alfred Gockel
Park West Gallery Collection

I have known Alfred (Alex to his friends) for many years. In fact, when we are together (we are the same age) at Park West Gallery events we often receive comments about how similar we look (he’s a much better dresser) and we’ve shared many laughs about being “separated at birth.” But together during auctions at sea as well as Park West Gallery events in locations on dry land, we have traversed the globe and our time shared has always been special for me.

Steeped deeply in the history of art, Alfred is adept at a myriad of fine art disciplines beyond painting, including etching, serigraphy, lithography, sculpture and jewelry design. When we are together (whether it’s in Russia, Berlin, or Las Vegas), we jockey back and forth, bantering like two old Jazz musicians reminiscing about their mentors and inspirations. Except in our case, rather than names like Coltrane, Miles, Charlie Parker or Louis Armstrong, our conversations are peppered with the names, Picasso, Miro, Kandinsky and Dali…all clear influences in his work.

In 2009, Gockel painted two of the last remaining unpainted panels of the Berlin Wall, commemorating the 20th anniversary of the reunification of Germany. Gockel was invited to showcase these compelling and history-making artworks at the German Embassy in Athens, Greece as part of the reunification anniversary celebrations. In 2006, Alfred was honored by being chosen as an official artist of the U.S. Olympic Committee for the Winter Olympics held in Turin, Italy. Millions of people were exposed to his art through that event.

alfred gockel, park west gallery“USOC Olympic Celebration” by Alfred Gockel
Park West Gallery Collection

Over his career as the accolades have piled on and the celebrities, corporations and enthusiastic collectors have lined up to collect his artwork, Gockel has remained true to his original calling, humble and approachable. He possesses the stature of a “Rock Star” in his native Germany (another musical allusion), but neither this, nor his success has gone to his head. Instead he remains devoted to filling the world with art that is energetic, colorful, joyful and expressive of a lifetime of creativity in flow.

In 1910, the Russian abstract master, Wassily Kandinsky, one of Gockel’s artistic heroes wrote in his seminal treatise, Concerning the Spiritual in Art, the following:

“Color is the key. The eye is the hammer. The soul is the piano with its many chords. The artist is the hand that, by touching this or that key, sets the soul vibrating automatically.”

If Kandinsky’s words ring true, then the art of Alfred Gockel is playing a fine tune, and the world is tapping its foot and whistling along.

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→ To learn more about the artist, please visit the Park West Gallery Alfred Gockel website at www.parkwest-gockel.com

→ Alfred Gockel fine art is available for purchase through Park West Gallery and its cruise art auctions at sea. Browse the Park West Gallery Fine Art Collection at http://sales.parkwestgallery.com 

Read more exclusive articles by Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro at his blog, “Who Killed Art,” at http://morrisshapiro.com

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The Google Art Project

Take a trip around the world’s greatest museums and discover the masters.

Whether you’re visiting a museum, attending a Park West Gallery cruise art auction event, or (if you’re lucky enough) in the comfort of your own home, there’s no experience like spending time looking at your favorite works of art in person. But you can’t always travel around the world, and even when you can, sometimes the works you go to see are unavailable for public viewing.

Google Art Project

The Park West Gallery bloggers have spent the morning playing around with the Google Art Project, a new website that allows the public to access some of the world’s greatest masterpieces, from anywhere in the world. The site launched today and can be explored at www.googleartproject.com.

Seventeen art museums from the United States, Europe, and Russia, are collaborating with Google on the Art Project, a website that enables users to discover and view more than 1,000 artworks online in extraordinary detail. The National Gallery (London), Museum of Modern Art (New York) and Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) are among the museums involved in the collaboration.

The Art Project allows visitors to explore museums from around the world, discover and view hundreds of artworks at incredible zoom levels, and even create and share their own collection of masterpieces. Here’s how it works:

[Tip: When viewing the Park West Gallery Fine Art Collection, click the magnifying glass in the corner each work of art to activate the zoom feature — experience a more intimate view of the details, brushstrokes and textures used by each artist.]

What do you think of Google’s Art Project? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

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