Tag Archives: Park West art collection

Noah Creates Kustom Chop and Rebel Mouser

Noah, Disney fine art, Park West GalleryNoah “Rat Rod #80” | Park West Gallery Collection

In the following behind-the-scenes video, the contemporary artist known simply as Noah creates Kustom Chop and Rebel Mouser characters to add to his “Motor Mouse” series of Disney Fine Art. Take a visit into Noah’s private studio and watch the painting come to life right before your eyes.

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If you’ve recently attended a Park West Gallery cruise art auction or land event, you may have had the opportunity to meet Noah in person. Don’t miss Park West Gallery’s exclusive interview with the artist.

Visit Park West Gallery to learn more about Noah and view selections from the Noah Fine Art Collection.
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What Does it Mean to Be an Artist?

Are you an artist, or aspiring to be one? Have you ever thought about what it means to be an artist? How does one become what is considered a “great artist”? Where does an artist find the passion and inspiration for their work? In the following video clip, world-renowned pop artist Peter Max shares his thoughts on these concepts.  

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Catch the full PBS interview airing this fall on Inspiration with Lance Heft

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Park West Gallery has enjoyed a relationship with Peter Max since the 1970s, and is the artist’s largest and longest-running dealer in the world. View highlights from our collection »

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Noah Fine Art Presents Making of The Halos

The following short film—Making of The Halos—is brought to you by the Noah Fine Art Blog. Experience the mind, heart and soul behind the artist known as Noah. This is a glimpse into his life and happenings behind the scenes.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Visit Park West Gallery to view selections from our Noah Fine Art Collection and to Learn More about the Artist

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Yaacov Agam Unveils ‘The Heart of the Fountainhead’ in Taipei City

Yaacov Agam, The Heart of the Fountainhead, Taipei CityYaacov Agam’s The Heart of the Fountainhead sculpture in Taipei City. [via Flickr]

Yaacov Agam, The Heart of the Fountainhead, Taipei CityVisual Symphonies
By CATHERINE SHU • Taipei Times
Originally published May 27, 2010

Yaacov Agam, an artistic pioneer whose art weaves time, movement and color together, recently unveiled his latest work in Taipei

Yaacov Agam’s artwork plays with time and dimension. It constantly transforms and gleans inspiration from sources as diverse as religion and physics. The Israeli artist, who lives and works in Paris, is famed for his pioneering contributions to kinetic art.

One of his latest pieces, The Heart of the Fountainhead, was unveiled earlier this month in Taipei City. It encompasses the exterior of Shuiyuan Market near National Taiwan University, with rainbow-colored panels concealing air conditioners (which Agam refers to as “visual aggression”). The centerpiece is a giant mural facing Roosevelt Road that relies on audience participation to fully blossom. From the left of the artwork, viewers see a blue and white grid, with ovals, circles and triangles sparsely interspersed throughout. From the right is a geometric rainbow that spirals into a white center. When shoppers enter the market from an overhead walkway, with the artwork above them, they see a carefully balanced mixture of the two compositions slowly dissolve into nine large prisms…

Taipei Times: Can you tell me about the message behind The Heart of the Fountainhead?

Yaacov Agam: The artwork I call unity and diversity, because [on one side] you have this composition, it is only blue and white and then you have the other side, which is all color. The two are different, so you can call it the yin and yang. [The right side] is like the positive, with the revolving lines, the spiral and the color. It’s positive like the movement of life and then the other side is the opposite, with no color.

Traditionally, you have either the yin or the yang, but you don’t have something that combines the two meanings. It’s important that you have the two forces and that the forces give you something together. In life, in everything, we have positives and negatives, electrons, day and night, so when the two opposites meet in life, that is what creates the power. They do not destroy one another. Love is two things combining in harmony, so this is an expression of love and unity and true diversity… Click here to read the full article »

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World-renowned kinetic artist, Yaacov Agam, pioneered a new art form which stresses change and movement. Agam has been a member of the Park West Gallery family of artists for over 30 years.
Visit the Park West Gallery/Agam Collection »

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Peter Max To Receive Prestigious Pinnacle Alumni in Art and Design Award

Peter Max, Martin Luther King, The Black Alumni of PrattNEW YORK, NY—Peter Max and Annette de la Renta, two major figures in the art world, will be honored by The Black Alumni of Pratt (BAP) on Wednesday, May 26 at black tie dinner at the Four Seasons restaurant.

Max will receive the prestigious “Pinnacle Alumni in Art and Design Award.” President Bill Clinton will make the presentation by video. When Max learned that another honoree is Lee Daniels, the director of the now filming “Selma” about Martin Luther King, he donated a portrait of Martin Luther King for the BAP auction.

Both of the honorees are receiving their awards for both the marks they have made in the art world and for their considerable humanitarian work.  

[via  ArtDaily]

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Peter Max Honors MLK
Originally aired April 2008 on CBS’s The Early Show 
On the fortieth anniversary of the assassination of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968), artist Peter Max unveiled his latest creation for the set of “The Early Show.”

Vodpod videos no longer available.
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Park West Gallery has enjoyed a relationship with Peter Max since the 1970s, and is the artist’s largest and longest-running dealer in the world.
Visit the Park West Gallery Peter Max Collection »

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The Printmaker’s Art

Albrecht Durer, Park West Gallery, fine art printsDetail from Albrecht Dürer’s ‘The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” from “The Apocalypse: Revelation of Saint John the Divine'” (ca. 1497).

EDINBURGH — A collection of iconic prints by some of the finest European artists of the past 500 years is on view at the National Gallery of Scotland. The skills of artists such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Francisco Goya and Albrecht Dürer, are on display in The Printmaker’s Art, which showcases some of the most beautiful and intricate prints ever made. Exhibit highlights include an impression of Dürer’s celebrated woodcut The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and Rembrandt’s tour-de-force etching, The Three Crosses.

The exhibition website explains:

“Prints are made by drawing onto a surface such as a woodblock, metal plate or lithographic stone, and then transferring the image, using a variety of means, onto a separate sheet of paper.  Over the centuries, artists have exploited a diverse range of printmaking techniques to create an array of distinctive effects that cannot be achieved in any other medium.  In the process many great artists, such as Blake, Goya and Toulouse-Lautrec, have produced prints that are considered to be among their most brilliant and influential works.

The 30 works on display have been selected not only for their exquisite beauty, but also to trace the development of printmaking techniques over the centuries, and to demonstrate the sophisticated processes that led to their creation.” 

The Printmaker’s Art is on view through May 23. For more information on this exhibit, please visit www.nationalgalleries.org
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As the demand for rare works by the greatest of the Old Masters continues to escalate throughout the world, Park West Gallery is pleased to offer timeless and historic works by some of the most important artists of all time. Please visit the Park West Gallery fine art collection online to view selections by master printmakers including Rembrandt, Goya and Dürer.

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In a Studio like a Garden, Art Grows like Flora and Miro is the Gardener

“I think of my studio as a vegetable garden. Here, there are artichokes. Over there, potatoes. The leaves have to be cut so the vegetables can grow. At a certain moment, you must prune. I work like a gardener or a wine grower.” Joan Miró, 1959

Joan Miro, Park West GalleryLeft to Right: Joan Miró’s “Personage” (1967) and “The Caress of a Bird” (1967). [Credit: Fondation Marguerite et Aimé Maeght, Saint-Paul.]

COPENHAGEN — It has been said that artist Joan Miró (1893-1983) regarded everything in the universe as alive and as part of a great interconnected totality. An innovative master of surrealism, Miró also saw himself as a gardener, his studio as a kitchen garden and his artworks as plants that he cultivated to grow under his expert care.

When in 1956 he got the large studio space he had always dreamed of, Miró was finally free to express himself as he wished. The artist gathered gardening and natural materials like worn-out tools, branches and stones. He would cast in bronze or paint in bright primary colors the found objects, and later incorporate them into his abstract sculptures.

Through May 30, the ARKEN Museum of Modern Art is celebrating the artist’s connection to nature with a new exhibit, Miró – I Work Like a Gardener. The exhibit features 111 sculptures, paintings and works on paper as well as works in textile and ceramics created by the world-famous artist in his studio on Majorca

According to the museum website:

Miró transformed the objects and their meaning. The straw hat of a donkey becomes the face of a sculpture. An old butcher’s block forms the legs of a curious character. An ironing-board or a toilet seat is viewed as the belly of a strange creature. When we look at the sculpture we can break it down into individual components or see it as a whole, as a creature of the imagination. Like Miró we can both see the thing’s original function and open our minds to other meanings and possibilities.

The sculptures underscore Miró’s fundamental belief in a living, dynamic world full of possibilities. The late sculptures contribute to a new understanding of Miró’s painting, which is also dynamic and eternally mutable. A dot in a painting by Miró can be understood in turn as an abstract dot, as a remote planet or as the eye of a possible creature looking back at you. Everything comes alive in Miró’s universe.

For more information on this exhibit, please visit www.arken.dk/content/us or visit sales.parkwestgallery.com/results/All/Joan-Miro to view selections from the Park West Gallery Miró Collection

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Pop Artist Britto and Kids Paint for Peace in Israel

Peres Center for Peace, Romero Britto, Park West Gallery

Some of us can’t remember a time when we didn’t love to draw and paint, while others remember the first time we were dragged to the local art museum on a school field trip or by our parents. But hopefully, we grow up and learn to at least appreciate the arts, and, in some cases, we’re fortunate enough to work at Park West Gallery where we get to write about and be surrounded by art, each and every day.

Miami-based artist Romero Britto recently journeyed to Israel for the first time ever, bringing his colorful, vibrant artwork to a group of kids who were really excited to meet the Pop artist. On Thursday, Britto visited kindergarteners at the Yarden school in Tel Aviv, as part of a coexistence workshop organized by the Peres Center for Peace.

“I have done a lot of work with the Jewish community in Miami and always said I should come, but this is the first time,” Britto told The Jerusalem Post. “In Israel you see a great mixture of past and present, and I hope that there will also be a great future.”

Both Israeli and Palestinian girls took part in the coexistence workshop. One by one, each child eagerly lined up to have their portraits drawn by the artist.

“Only an artist with a child’s soul could create art like that,” said teacher Rachel Zchariah, who was introduced to the artist’s work while vacationing in Miami and later brought it into her classroom.

Britto, who is always determined to instill a message of happiness and optimism in his paintings, commented, “At the end of the day, we all want peace.”

Pablo Picasso once said, “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” Luckily for these kids, and likewise Park West Gallery art collectors, Romero Britto grew up to be an artist.

[Source: The Jerusalem Post | Photo Credit: Peres Center for Peace]

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